Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Energy News  


Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















BIO FUEL
Chicken Fat Fuel Emissions Look Cleaner And Greener

An emissions detection rake device is positioned behind the No.3 engine on NASA's DC-8 flying laboratory during ground tests of an alternative jet fuel made from chicken and beef tallow. (NASA / Tom Tschida)
by Gray Creech
Edwards CA (SPX) Apr 28, 2011
NASA recently performed emissions testing on alternative, renewable fuels for a greener and less petroleum-dependent future. The search for alternative fuels is driven by environmental concerns as well as a desire for reduced reliance on foreign sources.

"Renewable" means that the fuel source isn't some form of fossil fuel. The source could be algae, a plant such as jatropha, or even rendered animal fat. In late March and early April 2011, a team at NASA's Dryden Flight Research Center in California tested renewable biofuel made from chicken and beef tallow in one of the four engines of a DC-8 airplane.

The airplane remained on the ground during the test, known as the Alternative Aviation Fuels Experiment, or AAFEX, while aeronautics researchers measured the fuel's performance in the engines and examined the engine exhaust for chemicals and contamination that could contribute to air pollution.

It was the first test ever to measure biofuel emissions for nitrogen oxides, commonly known as NOx, and tiny particles of soot or unburned hydrocarbon - both of which can degrade air quality in communities with airports. NOx contributes to smog and particulate matter contributes to respiratory and cardiovascular ailments.

"The test results seem to support the idea that biofuels for jet engines are indeed cleaner-burning, and release fewer pollutants into the air. That benefits us all," said Ruben Del Rosario of NASA's Glenn Research Center in Ohio. Del Rosario manages NASA's Subsonic Fixed Wing Project, which sponsored the experiment through the agency's Fundamental Aeronautics Program.

The team ran one engine using Hydrotreated Renewable Jet Fuel, or HRJ, and another engine using Jet Propellant 8, or JP-8, fuel, which is very similar to the industry standard Jet-A fuel used in commercial aircraft. They also ran one engine using a 50-50 blend of the two fuels.

The experiment's chief scientist, Bruce Anderson of NASA's Langley Research Center in Virginia, said that in the engine that burned the biofuel, black carbon emissions were 90 percent less at idle and almost 60 percent less at takeoff thrust. Anderson added that the biofuel also produced much lower sulfate, organic aerosol, and hazardous emissions than the standard jet fuel. Researchers will spend the next several months comparing the results and drawing conclusions.

The recent test came a little more than two years after the same team used the same airplane to test two synthetic, or man-made, fuels derived from coal and natural gas. Researchers found that the synthetic fuels significantly reduced particulate emissions at all engine power settings and also saw some smaller reductions in gaseous emissions at certain engine operating conditions.

"NASA Dryden was excited to contribute to the study of alternative fuels for aviation use," said Frank Cutler, NASA's DC-8 flying laboratory project manager. "The results of these tests will tell us a lot about emissions generated by modern turbine aircraft engines using these fuels," Cutler said.

The test setup involved positioning the DC-8 at Dryden's Aircraft Operations Facility in Palmdale, Calif., surrounded by ground support equipment, emissions sensors, and test equipment trailers to house the researchers and observers.

The AAFEX tests in 2009 and this year were funded through NASA's Aeronautics Research Mission Directorate in Washington.

The experiments included investigators and consultants from private industry, other federal organizations, and academia. In all, 17 government, industry and academic organizations participated in the recent test.



Share This Article With Planet Earth
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit
YahooMyWebYahooMyWeb GoogleGoogle FacebookFacebook



Related Links
Dryden Flight Research Center
Bio Fuel Technology and Application News



Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News


BIO FUEL
Walki Biomass Cover: Improves Drying Process And Energy Content Of Energy Wood
Espoo, Finland (SPX) Apr 26, 2011
Logging residue is an inexpensive and easily accessible source of biofuel, but to improve the energy content it must first dry on the ground and after that it can be stored in piles for several months. To shelter the piles from moisture through rain, snow and ice, Walki has developed a paper-based, waterproof cover that can be chipped and burned together with the residue. The importance of ... read more







BIO FUEL
UNI-SOLAR Brand PVs Installed on Eurocopter Logistics Center

Solar power goes viral

Let's Talk About Solar Subsidies in Context

Lubi is World's Most Efficient Solar Device

BIO FUEL
BIO FUEL
Better understanding turbine wakes

Google, Japanese invest $500 million in wind farm

Manitoba wind farm comes online

Alstom Announces Commercial Operation Of First North American Wind Farms

BIO FUEL
In jumpy gulf, Sunni-Shiite tensions rise

BP raises profits, Gulf oil spill costs

BP logs soaring profits, but upgrades oil spill costs

Scientists Focus on Light Ions for Fast Ignition of Fusion Fuels

BIO FUEL
Majority of European firms fail on carbon reporting: study

NASA Releases Scorecard On Energy And Sustainability Goals

Coal miners cold on Australia carbon tax

Nonprofits Awarded For Energy Efficiency And Water Conservation

BIO FUEL
Volvo net profit more than doubles on strong sales

Mayor Villaraigosa Announces Electric Vehicle Pilot Program

Purdue picked for international 'EcoCAR' competition

Icon Parking Systems In Manhattan Continues To Roll Out EV Charging Stations

BIO FUEL
Can biochar help suppress greenhouse gases

Rotten meat doesn't stand a chance

Distribution of British soil bacteria mapped for the first time

Growing threat of wheat rust epidemics worldwide

BIO FUEL
Lake life around Chernobyl said thriving

Researchers Discover Optical Secrets of Metallic Beetles

Sony challenges iPad in tablet war

A scratched coating heals itself


The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2010 - SpaceDaily. AFP and UPI Wire Stories are copyright Agence France-Presse and United Press International. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by SpaceDaily on any Web page published or hosted by SpaceDaily. Privacy Statement