Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Bio Fuel News .




BIO FUEL
Sorghum Eyed as a Southern Bioenergy Crop
by Jan Suszkiw for USDA News
Lincoln NE (SPX) Sep 18, 2012


ARS researchers are developing ways to improve sorghum's potential as a source for biofuel. Photo courtesy of Richard Old, XID Services, Inc., Bugwood.org

Sweet sorghum is primarily grown in the United States as a source of sugar for syrup and molasses. But the sturdy grass has other attributes that could make it uniquely suited to production as a bioenergy crop, U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) studies suggest.

Sorghum is an ideal candidate because of its drought tolerance, adaptability to diverse growing conditions, low nitrogen fertilizer requirements, and high biomass (plant material) content, according to molecular biologist Scott Sattler and collaborator Jeff Pedersen with USDA's Agricultural Research Service (ARS).

It also produces soluble sugar that can be converted to biofuel. Residual fibers left over from the juice extraction process also can be burned to generate electricity.

Sattler and Pedersen's studies of sorghum are part of a larger effort by ARS-USDA's principal intramural scientific research agency-to answer a government mandate calling for the production of up to 36 billion gallons of biofuel by 2022.

Approximately 15 billion gallons of that total will come from grain ethanol, with the remaining 21 billion gallons to come from other sources, or "feedstocks," including sorghum, sugarcane, other grasses like switchgrass, and oilseed crops like rapeseed and soybean.

Sorghum and sugarcane are top candidates for production in the southeastern United States because they are complementary crops that can extend the biofuel production season and utilize the same equipment, note Sattler and Pedersen, who work at the ARS Grain, Forage and Bioenergy Research Unit in Lincoln, Neb.

However, they are not the only team examining sweet sorghum's energy potential.

At the ARS Crop Genetics and Breeding Research Unit in Tifton, Ga., geneticist William Anderson and his colleagues are working to identify desirable sweet sorghum genes and their functions so improved varieties can be developed.

In studies, they selected 117 genotypes from the ARS sorghum germplasm collection at Griffin, Ga., and evaluated them for their ability to mature quickly and resist fall armyworms and the fungal disease anthracnose.

Read more about this and other bioenergy research in the September 2012 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.

.


Related Links
ARS Grain, Forage and Bioenergy Research Unit
Bio Fuel Technology and Application News






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





BIO FUEL
EU confirms change in biofuel targets
Brussels (AFP) Sept 17, 2012
The European Commission rejected Monday charges that EU biofuel policy was contributing to soaring food prices but confirmed that it will trim its targets for their use. Biofuels were once seen as a potential source of cheap alternative energy but critics say they are often based on food crops or use land that could and should be used for food production, helping drive prices higher. "It ... read more


BIO FUEL
China solar dumping a topic for EU talks?

Hanwha Solar Enters Distribution Partnership with AEE Solar

Retail Complex Goes Solar With 1,196 Solar PV Panel System from Eclipsall

The UK's first solar powered major waste treatment plant

BIO FUEL
Sorghum Eyed as a Southern Bioenergy Crop

EU confirms change in biofuel targets

France reconsiders plans to boost biofuel use

World Energy and Hydro Dynamics team up to promote SPR cavitation reactor technology

BIO FUEL
Sufficient wind energy available to meet global demands without damaging climate

Report backs greater role for wind energy

Wind could meet many times world's total power demand by 2030

High-altitude winds have large potential as a source of clean energy

BIO FUEL
EU MPs call for 'robust' oversight of shale gas development

Dry-run experiments verify key aspect of Sandia nuclear fusion concept

Rosneft's Cooperates with Eni and Statoil in the Arctic

Japan calls for reform of LNG markets

BIO FUEL
Home sweet lab: Computerized house to generate as much energy as it uses

'Smart growth' strategies curb car use, greenhouse gas emissions

China to invest $3.5 bn in Zimbabwe power plant: report

EP passes sulfur fuel, efficiency bills

BIO FUEL
Japan auto giants scale back China production

Obama to launch China WTO action on autos

Volvo Cars cuts consultant jobs

Engine for 1,000 mph car to be tested

BIO FUEL
Sweden seeks flexibility on EU ag reforms

Warmer Temperatures Make New USDA Plant Zone Map Obsolete

New gene could lead to better bug-resistant plants

Italian architect designs world's biggest vertical garden

BIO FUEL
e2v chosen to supply high performance imaging sensors for Japan's X-ray Free-Electron Laser

Less wear, longer life for memory storage device

Solving bubble troubles: new surface can prevent liquid explosions or even frost

International team of physicists makes discovery about temperature in convection




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement