Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Bio Fuel News .




BIO FUEL
Process holds promise for production of synthetic gasoline
by Staff Writers
Chicago IL (SPX) Dec 03, 2013


UIC researchers Amin Salehi-Khojin (seated), Bijandra Kumar and Mohammad Asadi. Photo: Roberta Dupuis-Devlin/UIC Photo Services.

A chemical system developed by researchers at the University of Illinois at Chicago can efficiently perform the first step in the process of creating syngas, gasoline and other energy-rich products out of carbon dioxide.

A novel "co-catalyst" system using inexpensive, easy to fabricate carbon-based nanofiber materials efficiently converts carbon dioxide to carbon monoxide, a useful starting-material for synthesizing fuels. The findings have been published online in advance of print in the journal Nature Communications.

"I believe this can open a new field for the design of inexpensive and efficient catalytic systems for the many researchers already working with these easily manipulated advanced carbon materials," says Amin Salehi-Khojin, UIC professor of mechanical and industrial engineering and principal investigator on the study.

Researchers have spent decades trying to find an efficient, commercially viable way to chemically "reduce," or lower the oxidation state, of carbon dioxide. The UIC researchers approached the problem in a new way.

Although reducing carbon dioxide is a two-step process, chemists had commonly used a single catalyst, Salehi-Khojin said. He and his colleagues experimented with using different catalysts for each step.

In previous work, Salehi-Khojin used an ionic liquid to catalyze the first step of the reaction, and silver for the final reduction to carbon monoxide. The co-catalyst system was more efficient than single-catalyst carbon dioxide reduction systems, he said.

But silver is expensive. So he and his coworkers set out to see if a relatively new class of metal-free catalysts - graphitic carbon structures doped with other reactive atoms - might work in place of the silver.

They tried a common structural material, carbon nanofibers, which was doped with nitrogen, as a substitute for silver to catalyze the second step.

When these carbon materials are used as catalysts, the doping atoms, most often nitrogen, drive the reduction reaction. But, through careful study of this particular reaction, the researchers found that it was not the nitrogen that was the catalyst.

"It was the carbon atom sitting next to the dopant that was responsible," said Mohammad Asadi, a UIC graduate student who is one of two first-authors of the study.

"We were very surprised at first," Asadi said.

But as they continued to characterize the reaction it became clear not only that carbon was catalyzing the reaction, but that the co-catalyst system was more efficient than silver, "showing substantial synergistic effects," Asadi said.

Bijandra Kumar, UIC research scholar and the other first-author of the paper, said the team "uncovered the hidden mechanism" of the co-catalyzed reaction, which has "opened up a lot of options for designing inexpensive and efficient catalyst system for carbon dioxide conversion."

"Further, one can imagine that using atomically-thin, two-dimensional graphene nano-sheets, which have extremely high surface area and can easily be designed with dopant atoms like nitrogen, we can develop even far more efficient catalyst systems," Kumar said.

"If the reaction happened on the dopant, we would not have much freedom in terms of structure," said Salehi-Khojin. In that case, little could be done to increase the efficiency or stability of the reaction.

But with the reaction happening on the carbon, "we have enormous freedom" to use these very advanced carbon materials to optimize the reaction, he said.

The researchers hope that their research leads to commercially viable processes for the production of syngas and even gasoline from carbon dioxide.

Co-authors are Davide Pisasale, Suman Sinha-Ray, Jeremiah Abiade and Alexander Yarin from UIC and Brian Rosen and Richard Haasch from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign.

.


Related Links
University of Illinois at Chicago
Bio Fuel Technology and Application News






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





BIO FUEL
Microbiologists reveal unexpected properties of methane-producing microbe
Amherst MA (SPX) Nov 26, 2013
For 40 years, scientists thought they understood how certain bacteria work together to anaerobically digest biomass to produce methane gas, important in bioenergy and the major source of greenhouse gas. But now microbiologists in Derek Lovley's lab at the University of Massachusetts Amherst show for the first time that one of the most abundant methane-producing microorganisms on earth makes dire ... read more


BIO FUEL
Oregon researchers shed new light on solar water-splitting process

Natcore Technology Moves Toward Low-Temperature Production Of Solar Cells

UC Davis West Village: Setting The Standard

Dow Corning and Tianwei New Energy Collaborate on Leading Edge Solar Solution

BIO FUEL
Process holds promise for production of synthetic gasoline

Microbiologists reveal unexpected properties of methane-producing microbe

Direvo completes lab scale development of low cost lactic acid production

Scripps Oceanography Researchers Engineer Breakthrough for Biofuel Production

BIO FUEL
Small-Wind Power Market to Reach $3 Billion by 2020

Siemens achieves major step in type certification for 6MW Offshore Wind Turbine

IKEA invests in Canadian wind project

High bat mortality from wind turbines

BIO FUEL
Greenpeace activists held after crashing energy conference

Singapore ready to be LNG trading hub

Actor Bardem's mother protests Canaries oil-drilling

Better combustion through plasma

BIO FUEL
India needs $2.1 trillion investment for energy: IEA

Rice U. study: It's not easy 'being green'

Founders of Envirofit Selected as Energy Innovators of the Year by The Economist

World's top carbon emitter China expands emissions trading

BIO FUEL
Sweden joins race for self-driving cars

Motorized bicycle wheel said to give 20 mph speed, range of 30 miles

Electric cars take 10% of new sales in Norway: official data

Carmakers rev up for return to Iran market

BIO FUEL
Benefit of bees even bigger than thought: food study

Romania sees opportunity in China's new taste for meat

Flower Power - Researchers breed new varieties of chamomile

A plant which acclimatizes with no exterior influence

BIO FUEL
Google steps up its battle for Internet 'cloud'

Use of ancient lead in modern physics experiments ignites debate

Crippled space telescope given second life, new mission

Scientists create perfect solution to iron out kinks in surfaces




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement