Free Newsletters - Space News - Defense Alert - Environment Report - Energy Monitor
. Bio Fuel News .




BIO FUEL
Metabolically engineered E. coli producing phenol
by Staff Writers
Daejeon, South Korea (SPX) Oct 11, 2013


File image.

Many chemicals we use in everyday life are derived from fossil resources. Due to the increasing concerns on the use of fossil resources, there has been much interest in producing chemicals from renewable resources through biotechnology.

Phenol is an important commodity chemical, and is a starting material for the production of numerous industrial chemicals and polymers, including bisphenol A and phenolic resins, and others. At present, the production of phenol entirely depends on the chemical synthesis from benzene, and its annual production exceeds 8 million tons worldwide. Microbial production of phenol seems to be a non-viable process considering the high toxicity of phenol to the cell.

In the paper published online in Biotechnology Journal, a Korean research team led by Distinguished Professor Sang Yup Lee at the Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering from the Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST) reported the successful development of an engineered Escherichia coli (E. coli) strain which can produce phenol from glucose.

E. coli has been a workhorse for biological production of various value-added compounds such as succinic acid and 1,4-butanediol in industrial scale. However, due to its low tolerance to phenol, E. coli was not considered a viable host strain for the biological production of phenol.

Professor Lee's team, a leading research group in metabolic engineering, noted the genetic and physiological differences of various E. coli strains and investigated 18 different E. coli strains with respect to phenol tolerance and engineered all of the 18 strains simultaneously. If the traditional genetic engineering methods were used, this work would have taken years to do.

To overcome this challenge, the research team used synthetic small RNA (sRNA) technology they recently developed (Nature Biotechnology, vol 31, pp 170-174, 2013). The sRNA technology allowed the team to screen 18 E. coli strains with respect to the phenol tolerance, and the activities of the metabolic pathway and enzyme involved in the production of phenol.

The research team also metabolically engineered the E. coli strains to increase carbon flux toward phenol and finally generated an engineered E. coli strain which can produce phenol from glucose.

Furthermore, the team developed a biphasic extractive fermentation process to minimize the toxicity of phenol to E. coli cells. Glycerol tributyrate was found to have low toxicity to E. coli and allowed efficient extraction of phenol from the culture broth.

Through the biphasic fed-batch fermentation using glycerol tributyrate as an in situ extractant, the final engineered E. coli strain produced phenol to the highest titer and productivity reported (3.8 g/L and 0.18 g/L/h, respectively).

The strategy used for the strain development and the fermentation process will serve as a framework for metabolic engineering of microorganisms for the production of toxic chemicals from renewable resources.

.


Related Links
The Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology (KAIST)
Bio Fuel Technology and Application News






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





BIO FUEL
Working together: bacteria join forces to produce electricity
Tempe AZ (SPX) Oct 11, 2013
Bacterial cells use an impressive range of strategies to grow, develop and sustain themselves. Despite their tiny size, these specialized machines interact with one another in intricate ways. In new research conducted at Arizona State University's Biodesign Institute, Jonathan Badalamenti, Cesar Torres and Rosa Krajmalnik-Brown explore the relationships of two important bacterial forms, de ... read more


BIO FUEL
University of Calgary solar teams on the world stage

Major leap towards graphene for solar cells

Rocketdyne Tests High Concentrated PV System

NREL Releases New Roadmap to Reducing Solar PV "Soft Costs" by 2020

BIO FUEL
Metabolically engineered E. coli producing phenol

Team uses a cellulosic biofuels byproduct to increase ethanol yield

Working together: bacteria join forces to produce electricity

UCLA engineers develop new metabolic pathway to more efficiently convert sugars into biofuels

BIO FUEL
Installation of the first AREVA turbines at Trianel Windpark Borkum and Global Tech 1

Trump's suit to halt wind farm project to be heard in November

Ireland connects first community-owned wind farm to grid

Moventas significantly expands wind footprint

BIO FUEL
US shutdown delaying Keystone XL pipeline review

Kremlin protests arrest of Russian diplomat by Dutch police

Disney Research discovers rubbing, tapping paper-like material creates electrical current

France upholds fracking ban

BIO FUEL
Real-life hobbit village channels eco-values

IEA: Southeast Asia's energy demand to increase 80 percent

Nigeria signs $1.3 bn power plant deal with China

Myanmar's energy sector boosted by World Bank investment

BIO FUEL
China auto sales jump 19.7% in September

Toyota unveils cars with auto pilot

Ford expands in Asia, sees sales over 1 mln this year

London black taxis turn white for Australia

BIO FUEL
Rural land use policies curb wildfire risks - to a point

New potential for nutrient-rich prairie fruits

European retailers embrace crooked fruit, ugly veggies

Google Street View is new arm against alien species

BIO FUEL
Ultraviolet light to the extreme

Quantum computers: Trust is good, proof is better

Ultrasound system gives virtual feeling of objects in mid-air

Himawari and Mitsubishi Electric Complete Facilities For Weather Satellite Ops




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement