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BIO FUEL
Expanding Options And Identifying Obstacles Of Cellulosic Ethanol

ARS microbiologist Ken Bischoff has developed a shake-flask model to simulate the bacterial outbreaks that can contaminate ethanol plants and cut yields as much as 27 percent. Photo by Stephen Ausmus.
by Ann Perry
Washington DC (SPX) Apr 14, 2010
Agricultural Research Service (ARS) scientists are figuring out how to turn wheat straw into ethanol "gold," and learning more about the bacteria that can "infect" ethanol plants and interfere with fuel production.

At the ARS National Center for Agricultural Utilization Research (NCAUR) in Peoria, Ill., ARS chemist Badal Saha conducted a 5-year study that examined whether wheat straw-a crop residue left over after the grain has been harvested-could have commercial potential for cellulosic ethanol production.

Saha found he could access and ferment almost all the plant sugars in the biofeedstock when it was pretreated with alkaline peroxide and then broken down by enzymes. This process released even hard-to-reach sugars in plant cell walls, which significantly boosted the overall ethanol output to around 93 gallons per ton of wheat straw.

But the same environments that facilitate fermentation can also nurture microorganisms that "infect" ethanol production facilities and disrupt output.

ARS geneticist Tim Leathers collected bacteria from samples at commercial ethanol facilities, including a wet-mill facility that had never been dosed with antibiotics and a dry-grind facility that periodically dosed with antibiotics after bacterial outbreaks. He found that most of the bacterial isolates he collected from both facilities were different types of lactic acid bacteria.

Meanwhile, ARS microbiologist Ken Bischoff developed a model for simulating bacterial contamination and infection. He found that when test cultures were inoculated with Lactobacillus fermentum-one of the most common sources of bacterial infections in ethanol plants-ethanol yields decreased by 27 percent. Sometimes the "infection" could be cured with antibiotics, but he also found one bacterial strain that was already resistant to treatment.

Results from this research have been published in several journals, including Biotechnology and Bioengineering, the Journal of Biobased Materials and Bioenergy, and the Journal of Industrial Microbiology and Biotechnology.

Read more about this research in the April 2010 issue of Agricultural Research magazine.

ARS is the principal intramural scientific research agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA). This research supports the USDA priority of developing new sources of bioenergy.



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BIO FUEL
More Economical Process For Making Ethanol From Nonfood Sources
San Francisco CA (SPX) Mar 31, 2010
Scientists in Wisconsin are reporting discovery of a way to lower the cost of converting wood, corn stalks and leaves, switch grass, and other non-food biomass materials into ethanol fuel. They describe their process, which reduces amounts of costly enzymes needed to break down tough fibrous cellulose matter in biomass for fermentation into alcohol, here today at the 239th National Meeting of th ... read more







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