Subscribe free to our newsletters via your
  Energy News  




Subscribe free to our newsletters via your




















BIO FUEL
Cold conversion of food waste into renewable energy and fertilizer
by Staff Writers
Montreal, Canada (SPX) Jun 01, 2017


By employing devices such as biogas storage domes, biofilters or combined heat and power co-generation systems, for instance, methane can be collected, cleaned and converted into heat or electricity that can then be substituted for most fossil fuels.

Researchers from Concordia's Department of Building, Civil and Environmental Engineering (BCEE) in collaboration with Bio-Terre Systems Inc. are taking the fight against global warming to colder climes.

Their weapon of choice? Cold-loving bacteria.

In a study published in Process Safety and Environmental Protection, authors Rajinikanth Rajagopal, David Bellavance and Mohammad Saifur Rahaman demonstrate the viability of using anaerobic digestion in a low-temperature (20C) environment to convert solid food waste into renewable energy and organic fertilizer.

They employed psychrophilic bacteria - which thrive in relatively low temperatures - to break down food waste in a specially designed bioreactor. In doing so, they produced a specific methane yield comparable to that of more energy-intensive anaerobic digestion processes.

"There is enormous potential here to reduce the amount of fuel that we use for solid waste treatment," Rahaman explains.

"Managing and treating food waste is a global challenge, particularly for cold countries like Canada where the temperature often falls below -20C and energy demands related to heating are high."

He adds that the most commonly used forms of anaerobic digestion require large amounts of energy to heat the bioreactors and maintain temperatures for the bacteria's optimal performance.

"What we've learned is that we can now use adapted psychrophilic bacteria to produce a level of methane comparable to those more common forms, while using less energy."

'A promising new research direction'
Globally, more than 1.3 billion tonnes of municipal waste are created each year, and that number is expected to increase to 2.2 billion by 2025. Most of it ends up in landfills where it biodegrades over time, producing biogas, a powerful greenhouse gas largely composed of carbon dioxide, methane and hydrogen sulfide.

Left alone, this methane-rich biogas poses a significant climate threat, as methane carries a global warming potential that is 21 times greater than that of carbon dioxide.

But, according to the researchers, engineered anaerobic digestion techniques can also be adapted to capture such gases and transform them into renewable energy.

By employing devices such as biogas storage domes, biofilters or combined heat and power co-generation systems, for instance, methane can be collected, cleaned and converted into heat or electricity that can then be substituted for most fossil fuels.

At an agronomic level, the process also contributes leftover nitrogen- and phosphorus-rich digestate material that can be subsequently recovered and used as plant fertilizer.

The process for feeding the bioreactor is unique. It involves a semi-continuously fed constant volume overflow approach: the amount of food waste fed into the bottom opening necessitates the removal of an equal amount of treated effluent from the top.

The researchers performed various tests on the extracted material to determine its physicochemical characteristics as well as to monitor the biogas quality and quantity.

"There aren't many studies that look into developing new applications for treating food waste," Rajagopal says. "We hope that this study will mark the beginning of a promising new research direction."

BIO FUEL
Nagoya University researchers break down plastic waste
Nagoya, Japan (SPX) May 30, 2017
What to do proteins and Kevlar have in common? Both feature long chain molecules that are strung together by amide bonds. These strong chemical bonds are also common to many other naturally occurring molecules as well as man-made pharmaceuticals and plastics. Although amide bonds can give great strength to plastics, when it comes to their recycling at a later point, the difficultly of brea ... read more

Related Links
Concordia University
Bio Fuel Technology and Application News

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

BIO FUEL
New clean energy joint venture on Fiji Islands

Replacing coal with solar can save lives and money

Artificial transpiration for solar water purification

Paris withdrawal sets business world at odds with Trump

BIO FUEL
Qatar row exposes energy risks, British trade group says

Russian LNG vessel christened in honor of former Total CEO

Cuba could be a game changer, Australian oil company says

Canada to discuss clean energy with China

BIO FUEL
California plots to fight 'AWOL' Trump on climate

Exit has 'galvanized' US support behind Paris accord; Bloomberg speaks out

Isolated US lashes out at climate critics

Trump wants to 'stay engaged' on climate: Tillerson

BIO FUEL
Printed, flexible and rechargeable battery can power wearable sensors

Nanoalloys 10 times as effective as pure platinum in fuel cells

Off-the-shelf, power-generating clothes are almost here

Self-healing catalyst films for hydrogen production

BIO FUEL
Cold conversion of food waste into renewable energy and fertilizer

Nagoya University researchers break down plastic waste

A more energy-efficient catalytic process to produce olefins

New photocatalyst speeds up the conversion of carbon dioxide into chemical resources

BIO FUEL
Waymo turning tech talent to self-driving trucks

Daimler, VW eye China's electric car market

Germany finds emission-cheating gear on 24,000 Audis in Europe

Continental partners with Baidu on connected cars

BIO FUEL
Myanmar's edible bird nest industry comes home to roost

As temperatures rise, plants take up more carbon

Blockchain seen as tool in food safety

In China, maggots finish plates, and food waste

BIO FUEL
New method allows real-time monitoring of irradiated materials

Solving the riddle of the snow globe

Bamboo inspires optimal design for lightness and toughness

Model for 2-D materials based RRAM found




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement