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Bioheat - The Future Of Home Heating Oil

ASTM standard feedstocks used in Bioheat include waste feedstocks such as palm oil, vegetable oils and animal fats, although others could be considered including non-edible crops being developed by Innovation Fuels such as Camelina and Pennycress.
by Staff Writers
Syracuse NY (SPX) Jul 21, 2009
Innovation Fuels is enthusiastically supporting clean burning Bioheat fuel (any blend of pure biodiesel with conventional high or low sulfur home heating oil) as the future source for home heating oil in America.

The company also lends its support to the oil refiners, distributors, terminal operators and other home heating oil workers in Massachusetts as the landmark B2 Massachusetts Mandate for Bioheat takes effect in less than six months.

The mandate will require an average use of 2% premium, clean burning biodiesel blended into all heating oil and diesel based transportation. Massachusetts is the first state in the U.S. to mandate the use of biodiesel blended fuel.

The mandate is critical to the home heating oil industry statewide which has provided service to the region for generations.

"We are particularly excited about the prospect of partnering with experienced and dedicated Massachusetts heating oil providers to offer clean burning biodiesel blends to their customers," remarked Bob Lindenbaum, Chief Marketing Officer for Innovation Fuels.

"Innovation Fuels is a willing and active participant in the complete transition to Bioheat fuel in this country."

The mandate is groundbreaking in that Massachusetts - one of the Top 5 NORA (National Oilheat Research Alliance) states by volume together with New York, New Jersey, Pennsylvania and Connecticut - begins a process of change in the home heating industry for not only itself but potentially the entire U.S.

The Massachusetts mandate calls for larger amounts of biodiesel blends in the coming years with the culmination being B5 or 5% biodiesel in three years. B5 is considered by both NORA and the National Biodiesel Board (NBB) to be the benchmark blend.

ASTM standard feedstocks used in Bioheat include waste feedstocks such as palm oil, vegetable oils and animal fats, although others could be considered including non-edible crops being developed by Innovation Fuels such as Camelina and Pennycress.

The Bioheat required by Massachusetts must however result in at least 50% reduction in Greenhouse Gas emissions relative to conventional fuel.

Commented John Fox, Innovation Fuels CEO, "Oilheat providers throughout Massachusetts will have a very positive message to send its customers in that they can use a clean, renewable energy source to heat their homes and businesses and power their autos. They are the first but not the last in the country to be able to stake that claim."

The largest concentration of NORA customers for Bioheat are located in the northeastern U.S. including New York, New Jersey, Connecticut, Pennsylvania and Massachusetts - all states easily serviced by Innovation Fuels.

Innovation Fuels currently operates a fully integrated biorefinery in New York harbor and will shortly be introducing a renewable fuels terminal in New England, in New Haven, CT. The New Haven facility will feature barge, truck, vessel and rail access to heated storage for 1.2 million gallons of biodiesel fuel.

Innovation Fuels biodiesel can be blended into Bioheat using a range from B2 or 2 percent biodiesel to B20. The production of B5 or 5 percent biodiesel has been the stated objective of both the National Biodiesel Board (NBB) and the National Oilheat Research Alliance (NORA).

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