Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Energy News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



BIO FUEL
Researchers generate electricity from low-cost biomaterial
by Staff Writers
Limerick, Ireland (SPX) Dec 06, 2017


Mobile phone speakers and motion detectors in cars and video games may soon be powered by electricity generated from low cost and sustainable biomaterials, according to research carried out at University of Limerick (UL), Ireland. Scientists at UL's Bernal Institute have discovered that the biomolecule glycine, when tapped or squeezed, can generate enough electricity to power electrical devices in an economically viable and environmentally sustainable way. The research was published on December 4, 2017 in leading international journal Nature Materials. Pictured is Sarah Guerin, Science Foundation Ireland funded post-graduate researcher at the Bernal Institute, UL with (LtoR) Sarah's PhD supervisor Dr Damien Thompson, Department of Physics and the Bernal Institute, UL and article co-author and Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) Centre for Medical Devices (CURAM) investigator Professor Tofail Syed.

Mobile phone speakers and motion detectors in cars and video games may soon be powered by electricity generated from low cost and sustainable biomaterials, according to research carried out at University of Limerick (UL), Ireland.

Scientists at UL's Bernal Institute have discovered that the biomolecule glycine, when tapped or squeezed, can generate enough electricity to power electrical devices in an economically viable and environmentally sustainable way. The research was published on December 4, 2017 in leading international journal Nature Materials.

Glycine is the simplest amino acid. It occurs in practically all agro and forestry residues. It can be produced at less than one per cent of the cost of currently used piezoelectric materials.

Piezoelectric materials generate electricity in response to pressure, and vice versa. They are widely used in cars, phones, and remote controls for games consoles. Unlike glycine, these materials are normally synthetic and often contain toxic elements such as lead or lithium.

"It is really exciting that such a tiny molecule can generate so much electricity," said lead author Sarah Guerin, a post-graduate student at the Department of Physics and the Bernal Institute, UL.

"We used computer models to predict the electrical response of a wide range of crystals and the glycine number was off the charts. We then grew long, narrow crystals of glycine in alcohol," she added, "and we produced electricity just by tapping them."

Sarah's PhD supervisor Dr Damien Thompson, adds, "The predictive models we are developing can save years of trial-and-error lab work. The modelling data tells us what kinds of crystals to grow and where best to cut and press those crystals to generate electricity."

Co-author and Science Foundation Ireland (SFI) Centre for Medical Devices (CURAM) investigator Professor Tofail Syed said: "We also have a pending patent that translates our findings to applications such as biodegradable power generation, devices detecting diseases inside of the body and physiologically controlled drug pumps".

Previously, Bernal scientists discovered piezoelectricity in the globular protein lysozyme, found in tears, egg-white and saliva, and hydroxyapatite, a component of bone.

"The current finding extends the technology towards pragmatic, low-cost, renewable sources for electricity generation," according to Professor Luuk van der Wielen, Director of the Bernal Institute and Bernal Professor of Biosystems Engineering and Design. "The finding translates the earlier Bernal scientists' world-leading contribution in bio-piezoelectricity towards a large-scale and affordable application potential."

Professor Edmond Magner, Dean of Science and Engineering at UL, said: "UL's Department of Physics and Bernal Institute researchers continue to pioneer the use of biological crystals for electrical applications. This work places them at the forefront in the development of bio-piezoelectric devices".

Research Report: "Control of Piezoelectricity in Amino Acids by Supramolecular Packing"

BIO FUEL
Breakthrough process for directly converting methane to methanol
Medford MA (SPX) Dec 04, 2017
The direct oxidation of methane - found in natural gas - into methanol at low temperatures has long been a holy grail. Now, researchers at Tufts have found a breakthrough way to accomplish the feat using a heterogeneous catalyst and cheap molecular oxygen, according to a paper published in the journal Nature by a team led by Tufts University chemical engineers. Methanol is a key feedstock ... read more

Related Links
University of Limerick
Bio Fuel Technology and Application News


Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

BIO FUEL
Gore Mountain ski resort completes massive solar farm

Windows of opportunity: Solar cell with improved transparency

Burkina, France launch W.Africa's biggest solar plant

NREL develops switchable solar window

BIO FUEL
Iraq says southern oil exports set a record

Oil in mid-$60 per barrel range fair, Russian company says

Texas looks to port overhaul to keep pace with oil and gas exports

Danish gas field gets new life after fate questioned

BIO FUEL
Europe backing climate ambitions with capital

Researchers pin down one source of a potent greenhouse gas

German judges agree to hear Peruvian's climate case against RWE

Canada to explore trade, climate change fight, with China

BIO FUEL
Musk's record-breaking battery officially launches in Australia

Batteries with better performance and improved safety

Activity descriptors for electrocatalysts in energy storage applications

Statoil: Batteries can address wind power variability

BIO FUEL
Breakthrough process for directly converting methane to methanol

Convert methane to hydrogen without forming carbon dioxide at low-cost

Brazilian ethanol can replace 13 percent of global crude oil consumption

The water world of ancient photosynthetic organisms

BIO FUEL
GM recalling 1 million cars in China

Traffic-weary Chinese man fined for repainting road lines

GM sees 2019 launch for self-driving taxi fleet

SoftBank offer for Uber shares to cut valuation: reports

BIO FUEL
Gene discovery may halt worldwide wheat epidemic

Istanbul anglers keep up tradition despite stocks alarm

Genome of wheat ancestor sequenced

Fighting plant disease at warm temperatures keeps food on the table

BIO FUEL
Borophene shines alone as 2-D plasmonic material

UCLA engineers use deep learning to reconstruct holograms and improve optical microscopy

Study shows how to get sprayed metal coatings to stick

PPPL scientists deliver new high-resolution diagnostic to national laser facility




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement