Subscribe to our free daily newsletters
  Energy News  




Subscribe to our free daily newsletters



BIO FUEL
Olive mill wastewater transformed: From pollutant to bio-fertilizer, biofuel
by Staff Writers
Washington DC (SPX) Oct 03, 2017


During processing, olives are crushed and mixed with water in mills. The oil is separated out of this mixture, and the dirty water and solid residue are discarded.

Olive oil has long been a popular kitchen staple. Yet producing the oil creates a vast stream of wastewater that can foul waterways, reduce soil fertility and trigger extensive damage to nearby ecosystems.

Now in a study appearing in ACS Sustainable Chemistry and Engineering, scientists report on the development of an environmentally friendly process that could transform this pollutant into "green" biofuel, bio-fertilizer and safe water for use in agricultural irrigation.

During processing, olives are crushed and mixed with water in mills. The oil is separated out of this mixture, and the dirty water and solid residue are discarded. In Mediterranean countries, where 97 percent of the world's olive oil is produced, olive mills generate almost 8 billion gallons of this wastewater annually. Disposing of it has become problematic.

Dumping it into rivers and streams can potentially contaminate drinking water and harm aquatic life. Pumping it onto farm land damages the soil and reduces crop yields. Some researchers have tried burning the wastewater with mixtures of solid waste from the mills or waste wood.

But these approaches have either been too costly or have produced excessive air pollution. Mejdi Jeguirim and colleagues took a different approach. They wanted to see if they could convert olive mill wastewater (OMW) from a pollutant into sustainable products for practical use.

The researchers first embedded OMW into cypress sawdust - another common Mediterranean waste product. Then they rapidly dried this mixture and collected the evaporated water, which they say could be safely used to irrigate crops. Next, the researchers subjected the OMW-sawdust mixture to pyrolysis, a process in which organic material is exposed to high temperatures in the absence of oxygen.

Without oxygen, the material doesn't combust, but it does thermally decompose into combustible gases and charcoal. The researchers collected and condensed the gas into bio-oil, which could eventually be used as a heat source for OMW-sawdust drying and the pyrolysis process.

Finally, they collected the charcoal pellets, which were loaded with potassium, phosphorus, nitrogen and other nutrients extracted from the breakdown of OMW-sawdust mixture during pyrolysis. Used as biofertilizers, the researchers found that after five weeks these pellets significantly improved plant growth, including larger leaves, compared to vegetation grown without them.

BIO FUEL
With extra sugar, leaves get fat too
Upton, NY (SPX) Sep 26, 2017
Eat too much without exercising and you'll probably put on a few pounds. As it turns out, plant leaves do something similar. In a new study at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory, scientists show that retaining sugars in plant leaves can make them get fat too. In plants, this extra fat accumulation could be a good thing. It could help turn plants into factories f ... read more

Related Links
American Chemical Society
Bio Fuel Technology and Application News

Thanks for being here;
We need your help. The SpaceDaily news network continues to grow but revenues have never been harder to maintain.

With the rise of Ad Blockers, and Facebook - our traditional revenue sources via quality network advertising continues to decline. And unlike so many other news sites, we don't have a paywall - with those annoying usernames and passwords.

Our news coverage takes time and effort to publish 365 days a year.

If you find our news sites informative and useful then please consider becoming a regular supporter or for now make a one off contribution.

SpaceDaily Contributor
$5 Billed Once


credit card or paypal
SpaceDaily Monthly Supporter
$5 Billed Monthly


paypal only

Comment using your Disqus, Facebook, Google or Twitter login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle

BIO FUEL
India gets lending support for a greener grid

DOE should take steps toward facilitating energy development on its public lands

A little tension yields enormous solar crystals

UK unveils first subsidy-free solar farm

BIO FUEL
Oil prices start October with a flop

Report: Russia may be the next 'energy superpower'

KBR to work at gas sites in Algeria hit by terror attacks in recent years

Statoil, Shell and Total to store CO2 offshore Norway

BIO FUEL
Drought not dingos behind mainland Australia tiger extinction: study

Cost of climate disasters to reach half of US growth in a decade: report

Science denial not limited to political right

Canada Tory MP called out for referring to minister as 'climate Barbie'

BIO FUEL
Scientists harvest electricity from tears

Small scale energy harvesters show large scale impact

Research led by PPPL provides reassurance that heat flux will be manageable in ITER

Energy harvested from evaporation could power much of US, says study

BIO FUEL
With extra sugar, leaves get fat too

Bioreactors on a chip renew promises for algal biofuels

Researchers develop 3-D-printed biomaterials that degrade on demand

Enzyme's worth to biofuels shown in latest NREL research

BIO FUEL
General Motors targets 20 all-electric models by 2023

Tata wins bid to make electric cars for Indian government

Paris experiments with 'car-free day' across the city

Rubber meets road for Pirelli's market comeback

BIO FUEL
Global methane emissions from agriculture possibly much larger

Artificial light device boosts cows' milk yields by 9 percent

Planet-warming methane from livestock underestimated: study

Global network of botanical gardens contain a third of all known plant species

BIO FUEL
UV-irradiated amorphous ice behaves like liquid at low temperatures

The 3-D selfie has arrived

Ultracold atoms point toward an intriguing magnetic behavior

Researchers developing new technique that uses light to separate mirrored molecules




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News






The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2017 - Space Media Network. All websites are published in Australia and are solely subject to Australian law and governed by Fair Use principals for news reporting and research purposes. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA news reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. All articles labeled "by Staff Writers" include reports supplied to Space Media Network by industry news wires, PR agencies, corporate press officers and the like. Such articles are individually curated and edited by Space Media Network staff on the basis of the report's information value to our industry and professional readership. Advertising does not imply endorsement, agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement