Free Newsletters - Space - Defense - Environment - Energy - Solar - Nuclear
..
. Bio Fuel News .




BIO FUEL
Corn Cobs Eyed for Bioenergy Production
by Ann Perry
Lincoln NE (SPX) Feb 04, 2013


Corn cob residues that are often left on harvested fields to protect soil quality could be removed and turned into a source of biofuel with harming the soil, according to new ARS research. Photo courtesy of NRCS-USDA.

Corn crop residues are often left on harvested fields to protect soil quality, but they could become an important raw material in cellulosic ethanol production. U.S. Department of Agriculture (USDA) research indicates that soil quality would not decline if post-harvest corn cob residues were removed from fields.

This work, led by Agricultural Research Service (ARS) soil scientist Brian Wienhold, supports the USDA priority of developing new sources of bioenergy. ARS is USDA's chief intramural scientific research agency.

Wienhold, with the ARS Agroecosystem Management Research Unit in Lincoln, Neb., led studies that compared runoff rates and sediment loss from no-till corn fields where postharvest crop residues were either removed or retained. The scientists also removed cobs from half of the test plots that were protected by the residues.

After the test plots were established, the scientists generated two simulated rainfall events. The first occurred when the fields were dry, and the next occurred 24 hours later when the soils were almost completely saturated.

During the first event, on plots where residue was removed, runoff began around 200 seconds after the "rain" began. Runoff from plots protected by residues didn't start until around 240 seconds after it started to "rain."

Runoff from the residue-free plots contained 30 percent more sediment than runoff from all the residue-protected plots. But the presence or absence of cobs on the residue-protected plots did not significantly affect sediment loss rates.

Wienhold's team concluded that even though cob residues did slightly delay the onset of runoff, sediment loss rates were not significantly affected by the presence or absence of the cobs. The results indicated that the cobs could be removed from other residue and used for bioenergy feedstock without significantly interfering with the role of crop residues in protecting soils.

In a related study, Wienhold examined how the removal of cob residues affected soil nutrient levels. Over the course of a year, his sampling indicated that cobs were a source of soil potassium, but that they weren't a significant source of any other plant nutrients.

.


Related Links
Agroecosystem Management Research Unit
Bio Fuel Technology and Application News






Comment on this article via your Facebook, Yahoo, AOL, Hotmail login.

Share this article via these popular social media networks
del.icio.usdel.icio.us DiggDigg RedditReddit GoogleGoogle




Memory Foam Mattress Review
Newsletters :: SpaceDaily :: SpaceWar :: TerraDaily :: Energy Daily
XML Feeds :: Space News :: Earth News :: War News :: Solar Energy News





BIO FUEL
Biofuels Blend Right In
Berkeley CA (SPX) Feb 01, 2013
Winemakers have long known that blending different grape varietals can favorably balance the flavor characteristics of the wine they produce. In the future, makers of advanced biofuels might use a similar strategy, blending different feedstock varieties to balance the energy characteristics of the transportation fuel they produce. A collaborative study by researchers with the U.S. Departme ... read more


BIO FUEL
One in, two out: Simulating more efficient solar cells

Photon Energy Investments Expands to North America

Volkswagen Chattanooga Powers Up Largest Solar Park in Tennessee

Black silicon can take efficiency of solar cells to new levels

BIO FUEL
Reaping Profits from Landfill Biogas

Versalis and Yulex partner to produce guayule-based biorubbers

Agricultural Growth in Chinese Desert Offers Opportunities For Economic Value and Better Ecology

Biofuels Blend Right In

BIO FUEL
Japan plans world's largest wind farm

China revs up wind power amid challenges

Algonquin Power Buys 109 MW Shady Oaks Wind Power Facility

British group pans wind farm compensation

BIO FUEL
Sinopec aims for cleaner fuel

Hungary moves ahead on E.ON purchase

Deuterium Uptake in Magnetic Fusion Devices with Lithium Conditioned Carbon Walls

Oil prices rise after upbeat US, China data

BIO FUEL
Obama's energy secretary stepping down

Emission trading schemes limit green consumerism

Latest Ways to Make Your Business Energy Efficient

China coal plant shut by health chiefs

BIO FUEL
Light yet safe contender for city streets

Daimler puts foot on accelerator in China

China's Geely says buys maker of London taxis

Smooth ride at 300 kph

BIO FUEL
India's changing appetite throws up meaty issues

Hong Kong to crack down on baby formula trade

Hong Kongers turn to Obama over milk shortage fears

Global research team decodes genome sequence of 90 chickpea lines

BIO FUEL
Novel materials shake ship scum

Penn Research Shows Mechanism Behind Wear at the Atomic Scale

NTU research embraces laser and sparks cool affair

Bioinspired fibers change color when stretched




The content herein, unless otherwise known to be public domain, are Copyright 1995-2014 - Space Media Network. AFP, UPI and IANS news wire stories are copyright Agence France-Presse, United Press International and Indo-Asia News Service. ESA Portal Reports are copyright European Space Agency. All NASA sourced material is public domain. Additional copyrights may apply in whole or part to other bona fide parties. Advertising does not imply endorsement,agreement or approval of any opinions, statements or information provided by Space Media Network on any Web page published or hosted by Space Media Network. Privacy Statement